Episode 130: A Good Thing

The story of a Turkish family on the Black Sea who return to their village to raise goats for yogurt and cheese after years in the city.

28 responses to “Episode 130: A Good Thing”

  1. Joel Peterson says:

    Very interesting to see this family giving up what is assumed to be the comfortable, fulfilling, and safe life of a modern setting and returning to their roots to find it that much more. How was the cheese and yogurt, Daniel?

  2. cassis says:

    What a beautiful place, what a wonderful way to live and share peacefully with your family…not to mention how healthy!!!

  3. Marj Osborne says:

    It makes me yearn for such simplicity. We’ve branched out to a vegie garden and chooks, but this takes ‘grassroots’ to a new level! Wow!

  4. Natnat says:

    You guys are so awesome. I didn’t think it could get any better than (my fav) the udon story from Japan but here you are, yet again. One of my favourite countries and foods! Plus the people are so wonderful. How did you find/get in contact with this family (indeed many of the people from your travels) to interview?

  5. Baranvip says:

    Tebrikler Arıkan ailesi.

  6. Chris J says:

    Delightful. Eschewing a business based on the civilized infrastructure that is digitally connected and so fragile and based on collective perception and stepping back to a basic lifestyle based on production of goods, barter, and the associated good health that an active, not-sitting-in-front-of-a-computer doesn’t provide.

    Commendable, exciting, and a portent of my own retirement plans overseas…thinking of raising goats for the same purpose. Great stuff.

  7. Osman Serdaroğlu says:

    Thanks from Turkey for this excellent work.

  8. Adri says:

    Such an inspiring story! And love how you have captured it on this video. I just can’t imagine how challenging must be to work in another country and in another language that is not your own. But have to say that you guys do an amazing job capturing all of the nuances that make of a place feel real and true. Thanks for sharing.

  9. CasaCabrones says:

    Try some other cultures too. We don’t mind the subtitles! Interesting look-see into other peoples, practices, customs. Bravo

  10. Cheryl says:

    I’ve been waiting with great anticipation for this video, and am so incredibly moved by your beautiful work. Thank you for doing what you do, and for bringing the world to us in such an informative, compassionate way.

  11. Marie Harris says:

    How blessed that family Is to be able to live and work together like that! Beautiful!

  12. dwilliams says:

    How interesting that in this country they can take their goats out to graze without a police state, like America, monitoring every move you make, charging for business licenses, raiding your home and confiscating your cheese and milk because it is organic and unprocessed so all the nutrition is destroyed by heating and chemicals. How lucky this family is to live where they can truely be free and allowed to thrive with their home business.

  13. Pilar Cabrera Rodriguez says:

    COMER ORGÁNICO Y SIN MALTRATO ANIMAL!

  14. Epa Donoso says:

    I wan to buy some coats Now! Voy a comprar unas cabras ! I like this!

  15. aysun says:

    tebrikler Arıkan ailesi,harikasınız 🙂

  16. maggi says:

    how knew….preppers in turkey. this video was lovely. seeing the family work together is great. I do enjoy making my own yogurt and cheeses but I don’t have my own goats since I live in the city. goats are just the best.

  17. Zeynep says:

    i was wondering why the subtitles are making the old gentleman with the long white beard seem like he makes references to religion when in actuality he does not even utter a word about religion. thanks.

    • danielpklein says:

      someone else just asked about this… we don’t speak the language, we had the interviews translated. perhaps the moment before he started talking he said the comment about religion and the translator or us just made a mistake with timing. we will take a look back at the transcripts to see where an error might have occurred. Thanks!

    • danielpklein says:

      what does that line say “our religion instructs us to eat natural and be hard working”? thanks!

    • danielpklein says:

      looks like we found the problem, uploading new version soon!

  18. Sarah T says:

    The father did not say anything about religion.

    • danielpklein says:

      Interesting. we don’t speak the language, we had the interviews translated. perhaps the moment before he started talking he said the comment about religion and the translator or us just made a mistake with timing. we will take a look back at the transcripts to see where an error might have occurred. Thanks!

    • danielpklein says:

      ok – there was a timing mistake in there. thanks for making us aware. uploading a new version. should be up soon. and then the second religion reference must have been an error by the translator?

  19. CTK says:

    The father of the guy doesn’t say anything about religion btw, you may want to get a secondary opinion on the translation of the script. Although the old couple is wearing traditional attire very common to the farming communities in Turkey, they do not appear to be having religion as a marker of their identity. If religion is brought to the context as an observation on their traditional farming community attire, it is a big ethnographic mistake. As women’s headdress in this setting does not appear to be a signifier for her religious affiliation, but of her socio-economic and geographic identity.

  20. fatih says:

    I have read in somewhere that the best yoghurt is fermantated by means of ant eggs. It is totally a natural way of fermentation and was found to be the most delicious yoghurt by the tasters…

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