Episode 88: American Indian Mothers (and Fathers)

On our way across North Carolina, we stopped to chat with some Native American Farmers trying to change the food and work situation in their communities.  Plagued with high poverty rates and little access to good food, these folks were inspiring in their efforts to farm in a sustainable way.

  • Joan

    HI there:  It’s hard to catch the name of the gentleman with the feather in his hair and that of the tribal nation he is a member of.  Can you please add it into the description if possible?  Congratulations to them. A link to their history would add to the profile, as their cultural roots include thanking the creator at planting and harvesting.  The Slow Food movement (founded in Italy) http://www.slowfood.com supports indigenous peoples who are revitalizing their attitudes towards a sustainable food supply and the education of younger farmers.

    • Robflyhang

      I don’t see the recent rude post I received  from Fire Horse showing up here,  nor my polite reply. It’s been a few days now. Have no idea who is moderating this forum.

      I hereby withdraw from this conversation thread, unless it shifts to a positive attitude and mentality.
      All best wishes to the Lumbees in NC…..just don’t try to con me. You can’t fool all of the people all of the time.

      See you at the swamp when the Cypress turn…..Best, Robert


      • http://www.facebook.com/tacsgal Angelia Collins

        I’m glad he’s gone

    • http://twitter.com/sayarbie Steve Yarbrough

      Joan, The tribe is the Lumbee Nation of North Carolina who reside in and around Robeson County in Southeastern NC. The gentleman is Lynn B. Jacobs who is currently running for Chairperson of the Lumbee Council. Although I do not personally know him, he is a distant relative via my Great, Great Uncle Wade Jacobs. My Uncle was a pillar within the Native Community and was present at Maxton Pond uprising in 1958 when the KKK was ran out of Robeson County. I personally never grew up in my native lands but visited it frequently. The County considered one of the poorest in North Carolina. Like many of America’s native population, they tend to live below the poverty level who dominate some of the top 15 poorest counties in America.

      • wind in her hair

        My friends Dr. Lynn B. Jacobs is of the Siouan Peoples he is a RED CHIEF and he knows his peoples business. This man has good medicine and he wants his people to understand who they are. If you want to be Indian then stay were you are, if you want to know “who’s your people” then listen to the RED CHIEF Lynn B. Jacobs.

  • Robflyhang

    Jeepers Creepers…. I hope you aren’t falling for this baloney? The Lumbee Indians…..the feather in the hair is as close as they come ….. DO NOT live in a huge desolate area like some Western Tribes. They have as much chance to compete economically as everyone else who lives around here. The color of their skin is neutral…Try being black and earn a living ’round here. That shiny new John Deere Tractor and 4-5 foot rototiller on back…..guess who paid for that? Guess who paid for the shiny big pick up truck full of magnetic signs? Guess who paid for the office building you were in, when she freaked that a camera was there to document? Guess who paid for all those nice Brick Houses you drove past? Guess who paid for all those FREE agricultural classes the man just “loves to attend” everry time? Guess who has lobbiests up in Washington, DC trying to get approval for a Casino? Now THATS an honorable way to make a living?

    Plenty of good people here working the soil, struggling to earn an income without playing the “Poor Little Me” race card….If you took the time to look around, you probably noticed all the huge personal gardens…..grown by people who are willing to WORK…not just complain and demand handouts.

    No, I don’t have a dog in this fight….Just reporting the way it is.

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Jean-Pierre-Rousseau/100001948467278 Jean Pierre Rousseau

      you sir,are an asshole racist.

    • Fire Horse

      Rob, please do your homework before you fly off the handle. The Lumbee DO NOT receive full BIA assistance. Since they are only a State recognized tribe, they get some federal services and assistance from the Dept. of Labor, Office of Indian Education and the Admin. for Native Americans. If you want to live near a swamp, in rural N. Carolina and try to carve out a living by all means please… attempt to do so. Land is very affordable if not cheap for a reason, there ain’t much opportunity out there brother. AND, whatever assistance the do get is long deserved and long due. How would you like it if a bunch of disease ridden, resource exploiting, invaders came along and stole your family’s land abd attempted to disposes you of your identity and culture? Quit you whining and go back to playing arm chair problem solver form some other issue.  

    • wind in her hair

      Native American Quotes About Land Ownership

      “Treat the earth well: it was not given to you by your parents, it was
      loaned to you by your children. We do not inherit the Earth from our
      ancestors, we borrow it from our children.” –Ancient Indian Proverb

      “The American Indian is of the soil, whether it be the region of
      forests, plains, pueblos, or mesas. He fits into the landscape, for the
      hand that fashioned the continent also fashioned the man for his
      surroundings. He once grew as naturally as the wild sunflowers, he
      belongs just as the buffalo belonged…” –Luther Standing Bear

      “What is this you call property? It cannot be the earth, for the land
      is our mother, nourishing all her children, beasts, birds, fish and all
      men. The woods, the streams, everything on it belongs to everybody and
      is for the use of all. How can one man say it belongs only to him?”

      “One does not sell the land people walk on.” –Crazy Horse

      “We do not own the freshness of the air or the sparkle of the water. How can you buy them from us?” -Sealth

      “My reason teaches me that land cannot be sold. The Great Spirit gave it
      to his children to live upon. So long as they occupy and cultivate it,
      they have a right to the soil. Nothing can be sold but such things as
      can be carried away” –Black Hawk

      “We know our lands have now become more valuable. The white people think
      we do not know their value; but we know that the land is everlasting,
      and the few goods we receive for it are soon worn out and gone.” —

      “I love this land and the buffalo and will not part with it…I have heard
      you intend to settle us on a reservation near the mountains. I don’t
      want to settle. I love to roam over the prairies. There I feel free and
      happy, but when we settle down we grow pale and die. A long time ago
      this land belonged to our fathers, but when I go up to the river I see
      camps of soldiers on its banks. These soldiers cut down my timber, they
      kill my buffalo and when I see that, my heart feels like bursting.” —
      Satanta, Kiowa Chief

      “If we ever owned the land we own it still, for we never sold it. In the
      treaty councils the commissioners have claimed that our country had
      been sold to the government. Suppose a white man should come to me and
      say, Joseph, I like your horses, and I want to buy them. Then he goes to
      my neighbor and says to him; Joseph’s horses. I want to buy them, but
      he refuses to sell. My neighbor answers, Pay me the money and I will
      sell you Joseph’s horses. The white man returns to me, and says, Joseph,
      I have bought your horses and you must let me have them. If we sold our
      lands to the government, this is the way they were bought.” –Chief
      Joseph-Nez Perce

      “They made us many promises, more than I can remember, but they never
      kept but one: they promised to take our land and they took it. It was
      not hard to see that the white people coveted every inch of land on
      which we lived. Greed. Humans wanted the last bit of ground which
      supported Indian feet. It was land – it has ever been land – for which
      the White man oppresses the Indian and to gain possession of which he
      commits any crime. Treaties that have been made are vain attempts to
      save a little of the fatherland, treaties holy to us by the smoke of the
      pipe – but nothing is holy to the white man. Little by little, with
      greed and cruelty unsurpassed by the animal, he has taken all. The loaf
      is gone and now the white man wants the crumbs.” –Luther Standing Bear

  • http://twitter.com/kevinkossowan Kevin Kossowan

    Regardless of any socio-economic politics, I appreciate anybody who is willing to be that grateful for what they have. Perhaps that’s an old traditional way of thinking that was lost for a time, but that’s no different than in a lot of other places and cultures around the world, including where I live.

  • Robflyhang

    Kevin, exactly right…No difference at all……I think pretty much every mindful person is greatful and respectful for what they have….As the times keep getting tougher for many, we pay closer attention to what is real….our planet and our food/water.

    Jean Pierre Rosseau….Speaking of race does not make one a racist…..Or the original post by our kind hosts would also be racist. Wearing a feather in your hair does not make a person or group superior or closer to mother earth. Dumping garbage for pay on land owned by absentee owners doesn’t help much either.

    Name calling with no constructive input is useless……which proves the point perfectly on bad representaion of a group..

    The use of foul language is not appropiate here….Hopefully children are also following this blog, and they don’t need to be exposed to that yet.

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Jean-Pierre-Rousseau/100001948467278 Jean Pierre Rousseau

      just reread your comments from yesterday,because of course you are right about foul language,but i am sorry to admit i still stand by mine.i should have chosen milder words but they would not translate properly my disdain towards that kind of negative propos.

  • Robflyhang

    “;Spam” linked to diabetes risk in Native Americans Source: chicagotribune.com

    Here you go Jean Pierre, mon frere. Follow the link. Teach Your Children Well….Not how to Cop Out & place blame

  • Robflyhang

    Jean Pierre Rousseau…follow the link to the Chicago Tribune. Upper right corner will be “Search” Box. Enter “Native Americans and Spam”….The article should pop up if you look closely. Who cares more about the peoples health.? Who is calling who nasty names? Who is being lazy and feeding their families imitation food? McDonalds, Spam canned meat, etc.  Claiming to be “First Nation” is no longer an excuse for poor choices…..or for being lousy examples to the young people.

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Jean-Pierre-Rousseau/100001948467278 Jean Pierre Rousseau

      thank you for the link robflyhang,but i could not find in it the reason for your intolerance.of course some people will maque poor choices in life particularly poor people in that case,but poor people are not native americans nor native americans poor people.and by the way being poor dosent make one lazy,i dont see why you call these nice people,who are realy triing to better themselves,like some kind of parasites and how would you know who paid for their machineries.come on man you are the perfect example of how ugly racism makes somewone sound.i agree whit teach your children well,my children are very tolerant towards others and forgiving for the little wrongs they see,but here at home we put racism,rape, bullying and murder in the same box.

      • http://www.facebook.com/tacsgal Angelia Collins


  • Robflyhang

    Hello Jean P R,, Thank you for the reply. It appears we may have a thoughtful communication going on here. I don’t sense we are trying to harm each other…..just Discus

    I take it you are not from the region mentioned? If you were, you would understand what I am talking about. I am NOT using silly generic terms such as “Lazy Indian” etc

    I don’t appreciate your placing my observations and respectful (as can be) comments in the same box as rape & murder?

    You call this teaching your children well?

    If you are willing to continue this important discourse in a civilived, courteous manner, so am I. Perhaps it will become a good example.

    If you choose to lower the conversation to name calling., linking my input to rape & murder, etc…..I will drop you like a hot rock.

    Oh, just so you don’t think I’m a Chicken Sh**…..I signed up for Perrenial Plate with my real name….No idea how I ended up on Disqus

    Best, Robert